A Summary of The Rowing Clinic

Jan 27, 2020 | Uncategorized | 0 comments

ONSIDE ACADEMY / KATE PARSONS MS, RD, CDE

a brief summary of the rowing clinic.

To be good at rowing you must be efficient. You want to generate more power while expending the least amount of energy. This allows you to go faster for longer. In rowing, every stroke matters, and split seconds on each stroke can make a huge difference over the course of 500, 1000, 2000 m or more. 

In addition, to be good at rowing in CrossFit specifically, it also means being smart. Knowing how to pace properly in a WOD means being able to get off the rower and still be able to power through 50 thrusters in a workout like Jackie, or a bunch of wallballs (hello 19.1 and 20.5!) without feeling like you’re going to die.

So, here are some basics to make you a better, faster, and more efficient rower. And to maybe help you hate it a little less?

The Setup Position.

Adjust the footrest position so that it’s supporting the ball of your foot

Set the damper between 4 and 7 (most people do best around 5)

A higher damper (like 10) setting will feel very heavy, and there will be too much air resistance to have an efficient stroke.

A lower damper (like 1) will keep the flywheel moving so fast it will be difficult to have a powerful stroke. Unless you have lightening fast explosive power, I wouldn’t recommend going below 4

Figure out your goals and base your metrics on that. By measuring every little improvement you can easily keep yourself moving forward.

The Catch Position.

Arms are fully extended

Chest up but leaning forward (1:00 position; hips should be behind the shoulders)

Loose grip on the handle

Full foot should be in contact with the footrest (ankle mobility may make this challenging)

The finish Position.

Legs are fully extended

Chest up but leaning back (11:00 position; hips should be behind the shoulders)

Pull handle straight into the sternum

the sequence.

Drive: the power phase of the stroke. 

At the catch, start with the leg drive (this is where the power comes from)

Body remains leaning forward and spine angle doesn’t change until legs are fully extended

Open the hips and lean back

Pull straight into the sternum

Recovery: the resting phase of the stroke.

Arms extend fully

Body leans forward (legs are still fully extended)

Legs bend to bring you back to your catch position

This is your time to rest! This should be slower than your drive, but don’t pause at any point. It’s just a relaxed, fluid motion back to the catch

stroke rate.

Adjust the footrest position so that it’s supporting the ball of your foot

Set the damper between 4 and 7 (most people do best around 5)

A higher damper (like 10) setting will feel very heavy, and there will be too much air resistance to have an efficient stroke.

A lower damper (like 1) will keep the flywheel moving so fast it will be difficult to have a powerful stroke. Unless you have lightening fast explosive power, I wouldn’t recommend going below 4

Figure out your goals and base your metrics on that. By measuring every little improvement you can easily keep yourself moving forward.

ONSIDE PERFORMANCE CENTRE

Email: info@onsideperformance.ca
Phone: (902) 404 5647
114 Chain Lake Dr. Suite 5
Halifax, NS
B3S 1B1

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